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Blog

Filtering by Tag: rivers

Featured Fly: Adult Crane Fly

leah kirk

This time of year the crane fly often is overlooked by southern fly fishers. In many streams it a key source of food for trout.  Crane flies, both in their larval form and their adult form, can be very abundant. On southern freestone and tailwater rivers, crane fly larvae and adults are relished by trout, especially larger meat conscious trout.

Hook:                    Daiichi 1260 size 6-10

Thread:                UTC 140

Amdomen:         Tan Antron

Foam Body:        2mm Tan Foam

Underwing:        White FluoroFiber

Overwing:           Deer Hair

Legs:                      Pheasant Tail Fibers, Brown Rubber

Hackle:                 Whiting Grizzly Saddle Hackle

Featured Fly: Josh’s Reaper Midge

leah kirk

Josh’s Reaper Midge.jpg

Josh Williams developed Josh’s Reaper Midge for use on tailwater rivers when trout seem to only want to take the smallest of fly patterns.  Josh’s Reaper Midge has flashy wings offer a great visual aid for the angler, as well as a nice wing silhouette for the trout. The hackle thorax holds the front of the fly on the surface tension.

Hook:                       Orvis Tactical Wide Gap Hook or dry-fly hook, sizes 16-22.

Thread:                  Black, Veevus 8/0 or 10/0.

Abdomen:            Veevus Iris Thread in color of choice.

Wing:                       Pearl Krystal Flash.

Hackle:                                     Grizzly.

Thorax:                   UV Ice Dub in pink, purple, or orange.

Carolina “Great Flood” Symposium

leah kirk

A century ago, Western North Carolina experienced possibly the worst natural disaster the region has ever seen.  July 15, 1916 was a day of extraordinary rain; one location along the Blue Ridge Parkway received 22 inches of rain in a 24-hour period. The mountains, historically a protector against weather extremes, prevented headwaters from spreading out to be absorbed into the high forests.  A dozen regional rivers raged down their channels, over their banks, and ravaged downstream communities.  The French Broad and the Swannanoa, swollen to unheard-of heights, devastated Hendersonville, Asheville, Biltmore, Marshall and many other communities lying in their watersheds.

What was the Great Flood of 1916 like, and what were its short-term and long-term impacts on Asheville and the surrounding area?  What lessons in emergency management did we learn in the hundred years between 1916 and 2016?  And are we prepared for the next floods that are sure to visit the French Broad River?

The symposium at Ferguson Auditorium on the AB Tech campus as we explore answers to these questions.  Several local organizations - Buncombe County Emergency Management, the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, RiverLink, Duke Power, the Western North Carolina Historical Association, the United States Geological Survey and the Wilma Dykeman Legacy - have come together to produce two days of innovative programming that promise to be both entertaining and informative.  The 2-day symposium is free to the public, so mark your calendars!  Attendees can purchase a copy of "So Great the Devastation," a 48-page heavily illustrated 4-color booklet about the Great Flood.