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Blog

North Carolina Man Socks Bear in Nose

leah kirk

North Carolina Man Socks Bear in Nose.jpg

Haywood County, North Carolina man, Sonny Pumphrey, 78, says he punched a mother black bear in the nose after she came toward him at his home off Liberty Church Road. He was working in his driveway Tuesday afternoon when he said he looked up and found himself eye to eye with a black bear.

                “Pomphrey was taken to Haywood Regional Hospital and released. He sustained scratches and possibly a small puncture,” said Fairley Mahlum, spokeswoman with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.  She said the bear had two yearling cubs with her.

Second bear attack this fall

This is the second black bear attack in Western North Carolina in less than two months, according to the Wildlife Commission.

In September, Toni Rhegness, 75, of Swannanoa, suffered serious, non life-threatening injuries after she was bitten and scratched by a female black bear near her home.

Rhegness was walking her dog on a leash about 10:30 p.m. Sept. 18 when she saw three bear cubs in a neighbor’s trash. As her dog barked, Rhegness shouted to scare the cubs off, picked up her dog and headed toward her home. The adult, female bear, which Rhegness hadn’t seen, then bit and scratched her repeatedly.

“It’s important to note that this black bear's behavior was defensive, not predatory, and the bear may have been responding to the barking dog,” said Colleen Olfenbuttel, Wildlife Commission black bear and furbearer biologist.

Mahlum said the Waynesville incident might have been a similar situation, in which the mother bear was acting in defense of her cubs.

“Both of these incidents occurred when females were with cubs, and both involved people yelling at the mother bear,” Mahlum said. “The folks did what they thought was the right thing, yelling and making noise, but they were so close, in both of the incidents, less than 20 feet from the bear. If this bear wanted to maul him, she could have, but she ran off.”

A black mother bear and her cub visited a home in North Asheville earlier this summer. Wildlife biologists warn people not to make loud noises around a mother bear because she might become defensive.

A black mother bear and her cub visited a home in North Asheville earlier this summer. Wildlife biologists warn people not to make loud noises around a mother bear because she might become defensive. (Photo: Courtesy of Leslie Ann Keller)

Mahlum said wildlife officers set a trap for the bear, but it is unlikely she will be caught because it is believed that she was passing through the area, which has not had many black bear sightings.

In the Swannanoa attack, wildlife staff trapped the adult bear and cubs and euthanized the adult bear to protect human safety and to keep the cubs from learning her behavior, Olfenbuttel said.