Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

           

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Blog

Breaking News: 2018 Hall of Fame Inductees

leah kirk

Voting is complete and there is six people to be inducted into the ST “Legends of the Fly” Hall of Fame at The Fly Show in Atlanta, Georgia on February 2nd. The inductees are;

Walter Babb of Sweetwater, Tennessee

Dr. Jim Casada of Rockhill, South Carolina

Byron Begley of Townsend, Tennessee

Kevin Howell of Pisgah, North Carolina

Roger Lowe of Cashiers, North Carolina

Alen Baker of Charlotte, North Carolina

            We at Southern Trout Magazine tip our hat and offer a warm, well-deserved congratulations. We invite all to join us in Atlanta at the induction ceremony. You will not regret being there.

Brief Bio’s

Walter Babb

            A modern day icon of fly fishing in the Great Smoky Mountains, Babb is the latest generation of his family to share his knowledge of these waters with others. He is also a talented fly tier and his Sweetwater home is where he crafts his incredible bamboo fly rods. As Babb is fond of saying about himself, “I’m Walter, the brother of James Babb, editor of Grays Sporting Journal. The exploits of the Babbs are chronicled in brother James’s books, where he is the acknowledge expert on Smoky’s fly fishing. Babb is also the owner of Tellico River Rods & Files in Sweetwater.

Roger Lowe

            Born in Haywood County, North Carolina, Lowe has been involved in fly fishing and fly tying all of his life. A talented fly tier, he has been a driving force in the keeping scores of old time Southern Appalachian fly patterns alive. Today he remains a much sought after guide at Brookings Fly Shop in Cashiers, North Carolina. He is best known for his popular book Roger Lowe’s Fly Pattern Guide to the Great Smoky Mountains: 101 Traditional Fly Patterns.

Kevin Howell

            A native of Transylvania County, North Carolina, Howell is the latest generation of what rightly might be called “North Carolina First Family of Fly Fishing.” Last year his father Don Howell’s entrance into the Hall of Fame was an emotional moment. Howell not only continues the family’s tradition, but he also is known for winning a national championship in fly fishing. Plus, he established Davidson River Outfitters, a very successful business, and he has also been the Tar Heel State’s most active promoter of fly fishing in its waters.

 

Dr. Jim Casada

            Known affectionately as the “Son of the Smokies,” Jim Casada’s roots go back several generations in the Deep Creek and Hazel Creek regions of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. He is the author of Fly Fishing and Fly Fishing in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The first inductee into the Fly Fishing Museum of the Appalachia, Casada is also an award winning outdoor writer, and he has been a book author for more than forty years.

Byron Begley

            A lifelong fly fishermen known to all who have fished East Tennessee, and especially the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Byron Begley has freely shared his knowledge and advice on fly fishing for trout in the South all of his life. Owner of Little River Outfitters, Begley regularly hosts not only the top tiers in the region at this shop to demonstrate and teach their tying skill, but also tiers from across the country. He has made a special effort to preserve fly fishing history and tradition.

Alen Baker

            Several years ago, Alen Baker visited the American Fly Fishing Museum, and upon his return home, single handily set about the task of creating a now well established venue of preservation, The Fly Fishing Museum of the Southern Appalachians. Prior to his quest, Baker was a lifelong fly fisherman who was considered to be a mover and shaker in trout fishing in the Tar Heel State. His record in preserving the heritage of fly fishing in the Southern Appalachian has been nothing short of remarkable.